Other Work

Knight Digital Media Center

The Knight Digital Media Center offers multimedia and technology training and resources for journalists who are interested in taking advantage of the opportunities inherent in the web. I have worked at a several multimedia workshops in a variety of capacities: webcasting talks, offering hardware support, supervising groups of reporters as they gather material in the field, providing one-on-one assistance with programs like Final Cut Pro and Photoshopt.

I also wrote the initial version of the Podcasting and Geotagging and Mapping Photos tutorials at KDMC’s web site.

Wired

I worked at Wired Magazine’s research desk in 2007 and helped out on issues 15.08, 15.09, and the Geekipedia. After returning in April 2011, I regularly contribute research and factchecking in a freelance capacity.

China Digital Times

China Digital Times is run by the Berkeley China Internet Project. It aggregates news and publishes material translated from Chinese. As a (now former) contributor I highlighted interesting English-language resources and articles online.

U.S. Geological Survey

I worked at the U.S. Geological Survey‘s Western Region campus in Menlo Park in 2002 and 2003. Check out the North America Tapestry of Time and Terrain, a never-before-published geologic/shaded relief map of the entire North American continent. You can see features like the Manicouagan Crater and the Snake River Plain. I helped with some of the map production and created much of the original web site, though it has since been incorporated into the National Atlas and reformatted. It incorporates the older U.S. Tapestry of Time and Terrain.

I also created several illustrations and photocomposites for a book about the relationship between geology and wine called The Winemaker’s Dance: Exploring Terroir in the Napa Valley, by Jonathan Swinchatt and David Howell.

Dartmouth Undergraduate Journal of Science

I was a co-founder and editor-in-chief of the Dartmouth Undergraduate Journal of Science. It features research and writing produced by students at Dartmouth College. Originally intended to be a straight scientific journal, I successfully pushed for the inclusion of essays, interviews, and other non-technical articles (basically, the stuff people would read). While much of my time was consumed with the establishment, administration, and fundraising necessary to keep the publication operating, an editorial highlight was the opportunity to conduct a long interview with the Freeman Dyson (also featured above in the Reporting section). If you are looking for my remembrance of the late Half Zantop, Professor of Earth Sciences, you can find it here. We started DUJS in 1998 and it publishes still.

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